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What is a Gas Compliance Certificate, Plate or Badge?

Accordance with Standards & Regulations

In summary:
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LPG Not Working: Help for New LPG Users (Nil LPG Experience)

While using LPG is very easy, being a new LPG user can be quite challenging. 
Where do you get answers? 
How does it all work? Who do you call for help? 
Even experienced users run into issues where they need answers or help.
This short video (8:29) gives a summary of what you need to know...
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Gas for Cooking: LPG Gas Cylinders for Cooking

Almost everyone wants to be able to cook like a professional chef, with a gas cooktop. 

Now you can!

LPG is Everywhere!

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How to Prevent BBQ Gas Fires

There has been a bit of news recently regarding BBQ gas fires. 

So, it’s worth taking the time to review BBQ safety.

The media is fond of reporting “exploding gas cylinders”.  

The reality is that LPG gas cylinders rarely explode. 

In fact, it would be quite difficult to make one explode.

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 The 25th World LPG Forum

Elgas tries to stay on the leading edge of LPG technology and trends. So, it was with great pleasure that we attended the 25th World LP Gas Forum, recently concluded in Bali, Indonesia. The Forum was organized by the World LP Gas Association.

The event was a great success, with a variety of key industry events and topics. Participants came from 70 countries, totalling over 1400 attendees. It included 80 exhibitors from around the world, showing the latest in LPG technology.

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LPG vs Propane - Is Propane the Same as LPG | LPG Propane

LPG is propane and propane is LPG. Essentially, LPG and propane are the same thing. Liquefied Petroleum Gas (liquid petroleum gas) - LPG or LP gas - is also described as just propane or butane. LPG are flammable hydrocarbon gases used in BBQ gas bottles and as fuel for gas heating, gas hot water, cooking gas cylinder and LPG cars.

Propane (C3H8) and Butane (C4H10) have very similar chemical formulae. Both flammable hydrocarbon gases are considered LPG - Liquefied Petroleum Gas. Whilst propane and butane are both independently LPG, they are unique chemically, being different chemical compounds. Both liquefy under pressure.

The chemical formulae for Propane – C3H8 – and Butane – C4H10 – are both comprised of just carbon and hydrogen atoms, as they are similar flammable hydrocarbons. Propane and Butane, while separate chemicals, are both classified as LPG - Liquefied Petroleum Gas – individually or as a mixture.

Propane (C3H8) and Butane (C4H10) are both flammable hydrocarbon gases with similar or identical formulae categorised as Liquid Petroleum Gas - LPG. Whilst they are different forms of LPG, they are still both LPG. Propane has superior performance in cold weather.

Whilst LPG is either propane, butane or a mixture of the two, they are different chemicals. Autogas is either propane or a propane and butane mix.

Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or LP gas) is also referred to by its constituent names - propane or butane. In addition to propane, LPG can be butane, isobutane or any of a number of different gases.

In Australia, LPG goes by a number of names including LPG, LPG gas, bottled gas, Propane, BBQ gas, camping gas and LP gas, so it can be quite confusing. In the UK, LPG is the same as Calor gas.

However, it’s all the same gas.

LPG are hydrocarbon fuel gases used for heating, cooking, hot water and vehicles.

Many of the gas appliances sold in Australia are manufactured overseas and call for propane vs LPG. So, you get it home, open the box, and it says that the appliance is made for use with propane vs LPG. Is propane the same as LPG?

But where do you buy Propane in Australia? 

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What Size LPG Tank Do I Need and How Many Gas Bottles

The most common size home LPG tank is a 45kg (88 litres) tank installed in pairs. We also supply 90kg and 210kg LPG tanks if you need more gas. Even larger LPG tank sizes are available for heavy users.

A 45kg (88 litres) is the size the majority of people need because they can be either refilled via an LPG tanker or exchanged with another depot filled bottle.

Two gas bottles allow you to use up all of the gas in the first bottle whilst having time to get a refill or an exchange replacement, as you use the second gas bottle.

The primary criteria for selecting the size and quantity of gas bottles installed should be the service considerations and vaporisation rate requirement.

Or, in other words, you never want to run out of gas and you want the gas bottles to supply gas at the rate required by the appliances.

Two LPG Delivery Choices - What Size LPG Tank Do I Need

45kg gas bottles - cylinders

The size LPG tank you need is should be the standard size 45kg (88 litres) LPG tank for homes, normally have in pairs. A 45kg LPG tank size is needed because this size can be either refilled via an LPG tanker or exchanged for another full LPG tank. Larger size LPG tanks are also available, if needed.

With gas bottle exchange, your empty gas bottles are exchanged for full ones by the delivery driver. 

With automatic tanker delivery, the gas bottles stay in place and an LPG tanker comes to your home to refill your gas bottles in place.

Gas Bottle Exchange Service

With an exchange service, you typically get two 45kg gas bottles

The 45kg size is used because they can be moved around by the delivery driver without any special lifting equipment. 

Never Run Out of Gas

The concept is that you call for a delivery when one gas bottle is empty, while you continue with an uninterrupted supply from the other gas bottle. 

You should never run out of gas, as long as you remember to order when the first bottle becomes empty.

Automatic Tanker Refilling

tanker filling of LPG gas bottlesWith tanker refill, you may have two 45kg LPG tanks, one or two 90kg LPG tanks or an even larger LPG tank, if you use a lot of gas. The tank size can be as large as required, because it does not have to be moved. 

Another advantage of tanker refill is that the deliveries are often automatically scheduled by the supplier. 

This means you don’t have to check gas bottles or even order gas. It’s all done for you.

There is one limitation with tanker refilling, in that the driver must have a clear line-of-sight between the gas bottles and the tanker.  

If that is not possible, then you will need to go with the exchange service.

Vaporisation Must Match Consumption - LPG Tank Size

The amount of gas that the appliance or appliances are drawing from the gas bottles must be matched by the rate of vaporisation and this affects the size of the LPG tank or vessel you need.

If a gas bottle ices up regularly, it simply means that the vessel is too small for the vaporisation load placed on it. 

Switching to a larger vessel can provide a higher rate of vaporisation.

Heat is absorbed through the vessel shell and into the liquid.

This is known as the “wetted area”.

The larger the tank or the fuller the tank, the more gas that can be vaporised at a given temperature.

Vaporisation tables (as shown below) are used to match the required vaporisation rates to the corresponding vessel size.

Vaporisation tables show the maximum continuous vaporisation rates, in MJ/hr, at different ambient temperatures for each available vessel size.

In instances where a larger vessel is not an option, the only alternative is to supply some artificial means of increasing vaporisation.

The units used are very appropriately call vapourisers.

LPG (Propane) Vaporisation Table

LPG Vaporisation Chart of Standard Size Vessels

Nominal LPG Vessel Size

Volume in Water Capacity

Maximum Continuous Vapourisation Rates for LPG (propane) at Indicated Ambient Temperatures. 
(in MJ/hr)
at 30% full
Weight
Volume
-18˚C
-7˚C
-1˚C
4˚C
10˚C
16˚C
45kg
108L
46
92
115
138
161
184
90kg
215L
70
140
175
211
246
281
190kg
499L
106
219
274
328
383
438
0.5t
1.35kL
235
469
587
704
821
939
1.0t
2.2kL
327
653
816
980
1143
1306
2.0t
4.3kL
545
1090
1363
1636
1908
2181
2.5t
6.7kL
826
1652
2065
2478
2891
3304
3.0t
7.5kL
921
1841
2302
2762
3222
3683
10t
23kL
1616
3231
4039
4847
5655
6463
13t
33kL
2214
4482
5603
6724
7844
8965
17t
43kL
2502
5003
6300
7505
8756
10006
21t
53kL
3492
6984
8730
10476
12222
13968
25t
62kL
3502
7004
8755
10507
12258
14009
33t
81kL
4503
9006
11257
13509
15760
18011
40t
100kL
5504
11007
13759
16511
19262
22014
© 2013-2017 Elgas Ltd.

Vaporisation Table Notes:

1. As a simple rule of thumb, when using vessels of say 2.75 or 5.1kL capacities, simply extrapolate between the two nearest size vessels but biasing your calculations on the conservative side. Always consult your supplier’s technical representative for advice.

2. Always check with your supplier’s technical representative that the above vapourisation rates are correct for the particular vessel you have designated.

3. For sites requiring a high vapourisation rate but it is not cost effective to install larger and/or multiple vessels, consider using a vapouriser.

4. Vessels above 3 tonnes or over 7.5kL will be custom designed by supplier to suit customer needs. Figures provided are only rough estimates, based on previous designs.

Help for New Users of Home LPG

New User Guide

If you are a first time user of home LPG, you will probably need additional guidance to explain how everything works.  
The supplier should provide detailed "How-to" instructions and answers to frequently asked questions specifically tailored for new LPG users.
Get your free 9-page e-book -- The Illustrated Guide to Home LPG
It is a pictorial 'How To' explaining everything you need to know.

Final Thoughts

It’s not so much about size, but how you fill them. 

Combined with the number and type of LPG appliances you have, this will help determine the size and number of gas bottles you need for your home.

 

 

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Comments, questions or feedback?

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The information in this article is derived from various sources and is believed to be correct at the time of publication. However, the information may not be error free and may not be applicable in all circumstances.

Published: 07 October 2012

Welcome to the Elgas LPG Gas Blog

A blog at Elgas?  Who'd have thought?!

Why Have a Blog?

So, why did we decide to start blogging?

Well, we noticed that there is a distinct lack of information being shared on the web when it comes to LPG gas and its related topics.

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