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Biofuels vs Food – The Ethical Dilemma

With over 7 billion mouths to feed in this world, is it right to be redirecting farmland from growing food to supplying feedstock for biofuels? 

Is the demand for biofuels driving up the price of food for all? 

Do the benefit of renewable fuels outweigh the food supply side effects?

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LPG - Propane Becomes a Renewable Energy Source

Science has now found a way to make propane renewable. In one ground breaking step, LPG-propane goes from being a traditional fossil fuel to a new form of propane renewable energy.

What do you get when you mix sugar with some very smart bacteria? 

LPG! 

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What Do LPG Gas & ATM Machines Share?

What does LPG gas have in common with ATM machines? 

HINT: It’s not that you can get money out of the ATM machine to pay for your LPG gas!

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Problems That Make You Use More Gas

As the years go by, does it seem like you are using more gas than in previous years? 

The problem is most likely something called incomplete combustion. 

The good news is you can fix it, conserve gas and save money, too!

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2 Gas Bottles are Better than 1

Many people wonder why they need two gas bottles for their home LPG instead of just one. 

The simple answer is:

“So you don’t run out of gas”

But even two bottles are no guarantee if you don’t know the “how” and “why”…

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Up, Up and Away with LPG

There are few things more colourful than a hot air balloon race. 

Hot air balloons are also the oldest form of human flight, going back to 1783! 

But exactly how do they work?

Hot Air Rises

The basic principle of hot air balloon flight is based on the fact that hot air rises. 

The air within the “envelope” (fabric air bag) is heated by an LPG burner. 

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What is an LPG Powered Zamboni 525?

It’s not an exotic Italian sports car but it does have wheels and tyres.  

The maximum speed of the Zamboni 525 is about 15km per hour but their machines have been involved in televised races, with thousands of fans going wild. 

Like a F1 race car, it has only one seat and four tyres. 

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How to Live Off the Grid with LPG - OTG

Living Off The Grid (OTG) is generally defined as living without being connected to public utilities, such as electricity, natural gas, water or sewage. 

In general, there are two groups of people who live off the grid:

Those that want to and those that have to…

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Is Propane a Liquid or Gas? Liquid Propane vs Gas Propane

Propane is a liquid if stored under pressure in a gas bottle or larger vessel. It is also a liquid if stored under -42°C.

Propane is a gas when released from pressure at standard temperature and pressure (STP) or normal temperature and pressure (NTP).

Both gas and liquid propane have applications but are not interchangeable. Propane liquid is LPG - Liquefied Petroleum Gas - fuel in its liquid state when under pressure or below its 42°C (-44°F) boiling point. It turns to gas above -42°C or when not under pressure.

Propane is a liquid when it is stored in a pressurised vessel. It is a gas at 0°C (32°F) and 1 atm pressure (STP) so, when released from a pressurised cylinder the propane liquid becomes gas. Propane is stored and distributed as a liquid but typically used as a gas for heating, cooking and vehicle fuel.

The pressure and temperature at which it is stored determines whether you have propane liquid or gas.

Propane is a flammable hydrocarbon with three carbon atoms and a chemical formula of C3H8. It is a gas at 0°C and 1 atm (STP) and liquefies under pressure for storage and transport.  LPG-propane comes from natural gas processing and crude oil refining and is used as fuel for heating, cooking, vehicles, agriculture and industry. It is a liquid under pressure and a gas at standard temperature and pressure (STP).

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We are Wasting Our Autogas Infrastructure?

It’s easy to imagine a situation with cars but no fuel. 

But how could it possibly come to pass that one country would have a well-established LPG infrastructure but no new cars to use it?

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